News

Find out the lastest news and information about the Libraries 2020 Campaign.

Why I Became a Librarian: Nijma Esad

I became a librarian because, as an awkward, introverted youth, books were my safe space.  I was raised by old people, so connecting to people my age has always been difficult. I found in books the connections I couldn't make in real life. In college, you're asked the question, "what would you do if money was no issue." My answer 


Why I Became a Librarian: Sherri Jones

I’ve wanted to be in education as long as I can remember.  My mother, a retired Special Education teacher, was adamant that I was not going into the field. In her mind, I could do something more noble than she.  I had so many opportunities that she did not have, and she wanted me to have the world.


Library Resources when (Newly) Working From Home

While many Americans normally work from home, they have been joined in recent weeks by millions of additional folks who are now telecommuting due to safety restrictions and lockdowns related to the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Whether you are brand new to the world of remote work or if you’ve telecommuted for years, your local public library can help you stay productive during this challenging period.


Ten Ways to Be Super-Productive While at Home with (Digital) Help From the Library

Social distancing or isolation because of COVID-19 shouldn’t mean boredom. Public libraries have long provided a fantastic assortment of online and digital resources for people who are going to be at home for a while.


State Libraries Stand in the Social Distancing Gap

As families across the country are challenged by social distancing and voluntary isolation in the face of COVID-19, libraries are helping to fill the entertainment, education, information, and inquiry gaps. While you may already think of your local library as a resource for digital and online resources, we want to encourage you to also check out the amazing resources from your state library too. 


11 Library Hacks for Riding Out the Coronavirus

Are you or your family under self-quarantine or lockdown due to the Coronavirus? Or has your employer asked you to work from home? With the Coronavirus (COVID-19) being declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization lots of people are stuck at home waiting. So what can you do during that time once you’re tired of binge-watching shows or you’ve read all the way through your pile of books? You may not know it, but your local public library offers all sorts of online services to help get you through your extended homestay — and it is all completely free of charge.


Libraries Help Families During Quarantine

Libraries have always been there for people in times of need or crisis, whether it is in person, over the phone, or online. As parents face the uncertainties of school closings and the disruption or cancellation of children’s activities due to COVID-19 (aka the Coronavirus), or if you and your family are currently homebound due to quarantine, it is comforting to know that your local public library can still be of service to you even from the safety of your own home. 


Libraries and Accurate Information about The Coronavirus

As designated essential disaster services, libraries are poised to serve a role in the national response to the Coronavirus and COVID-19. Some changes to libraries as a public gathering place may be temporarily required, but our mission of sharing information will likely continue unchanged. They will remain great resources to access credible medical information and connect to resources to help you and your community.


Climb Your Family Tree At Your Library

You may want or even need to find out about your ancestors for all sorts of reasons. Your library is an excellent place to start a genealogy-discovery journey


Weathering the Storm At Your Library

When a disaster or crisis hits a community, the public library often serves as a safe haven. Libraries provide a place of comfort, direction, normalcy, and resources to help guide recovery efforts for the people they serve. Library staff frequently serve at their local Emergency Operations Centers during and after a disaster. While we always hope for the best, it’s good to know that in case of a disaster, your library is a cornerstone of recovery.